Wednesday, November 14, 2012


It was 11:30 on a foggy night in Raleigh on Saturday, Nov. 23, 1963. The previous afternoon, President John F. Kennedy had been shot on the streets of Dallas. Just a block from the North Carolina State Capitol, at 201 Hillsborough St., Apartment No. 1 was about to be thrust into one of the most profound mysteries behind the assassination. And it would be a generation before its meaning would be understood.
That night, nearly 1,200 miles away at the Dallas Municipal Building, Alveeta A. Treon arrived for her shift at the telephone switchboard. Treon would relieve her co-worker, Louise Swinney, who had been given orders by their supervisor to assist two men in listening to a call that would come through their switchboard. Treon assumed the men were Secret Service. She suspected that Lee Harvey Oswald, the accused assassin being held in the downstairs jail, would be making another call. He had already phoned his Russian wife, Marina, and an ACLU lawyer in New York. This call, however, was different.
Oswald rang the switchboard at a quarter till 12, Raleigh time. Swinney took the call and scribbled Oswald's information as the two men listened in.
"I was dumbfounded at what happened next," Treon later told a former Senate investigator. "Swinney told [Oswald], 'I'm sorry, the number doesn't answer.' Swinney then unplugged and disconnected Oswald without ever really trying to put the call through."
Afterward, Swinney tore the sheet from her note pad and threw it into the trash. She left, her shift having ended.
For more on this little known chapter in the JFK assassination saga, click through...

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